“Muchier”

The number one question readers ask me when discovering my blog is:

What the heck is a "Muchier Scale"?

Good Question. Allow me to illuminate you.

 

The urban dictionary defines "muchness" as "the innocence and imagination that appears in the hearts of young children. As the children grow older, they become more mature, and gain responsibilities. They lose their muchness."

It also defines"muchier" as "when you have too much muchness and just don't know how to express it."

And then, of course, there's the Mad Hatter's summation to Alice of how she's changed in Tim Burton's movie Alice in Wonderland:

"You used to be much more...muchier. You've lost your muchness."

By the by, Lewis Carroll, the author of the classic books Alice in Wonderland and Alice Through the Looking Glass, never imagined these words arising from the mouth of his Mad Hatter--it was purely an invention for the movie version Mad Hatter portrayed by Johnny Depp.

The creations of both Tim Burton and Johnny Depp capture a side to muchness lacking in 99.9% of our adult society. A blurring of the wearisome lines of what is acceptable. Looking at reality through an honest lens that makes us all slightly uncomfortable. That whimsically wacky eerieness that suggests the world we think we live in is not the world that is.

Definitely muchier.

  And that, my dears, is precisely my cup of absinthe. I always write from this place of horrific wonder.

"Muchier" encapuslates the reason I love Young Adult (YA) novels and taught high school English and Theatre Arts for so many years, for it's within the penumbra of childhood and adulthood, upon that cusp of innocence and ecstasy, and onto that sharp edge between eerie and enlightening, that personal epiphany and interconnected immensity overtake us, infusing us with what can only be described as:

"muchierness".

And it is only in the muchier things that we humans don't simply live, but

flourish.

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